Olu Oguibe is Professor of Art and Art History at the University of Connecticut  and Associate Director of the Institute for African American Studies at the same university. An artist and public intellectual, Oguibe’s work has been exhibited in museums, galleries and other major venues around the world including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Irish Museum of Modern Art, London Whitechapel Gallery and the Johannesburg, Havana, Busan and Venice biennials, among others. He has also curated major exhibitions for venues such as the Venice biennial, the Tate Gallery in London (Tate Modern), the municipal museum of Mexico City, and numerous others over the past two decades.

 

Having begun his career as a literary and theatre critic writing in the London weekly, West Africa Magazine, Oguibe has gone on to make seminal contributions to contemporary art theory and criticism as well as postcolonial and new information technology studies with over a hundred published articles and essays in journals and other serial publications as well as volumes such as Art History and its Methods, Art in Theory: 1900-2000, Theory in Contemporary Art: 1985 to the Present, The State of Art Criticism, and The Visual Culture Reader.  He has edited or co-edited several books including Sojourners: New Writings by Africans in Britain (1994), Reading The Contemporary: African Art from Theory to The Marketplace (2000, with Okwui Enwezor) and Authentic/ Ex-Centric: Conceptualism in Contemporary African Art  (2002, with Salah Hassan), and is the author of Uzo Egonu: An African Artist in the West (1995) and The Culture Game (2004). He is also an award-winning poet and occasional electronic music composer.

 

Olu Oguibe has been a senior fellow of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC and the Vera List Center for Arts and Politics at The New School, New York as well as a resident scholar at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center. Between 1996 and 1999, he held the Stuart Golden Endowed Chair in African Art at the University of South Florida.

 

A self-described recluse, Oguibe makes his home in the historic village of Rockville, Connecticut where he keeps a studio and tends his collection of classic sports cars and 19th century Connecticut shelf and mantle clocks. His hobbies include writing, politics, and furniture and clock repair.

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